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If you fancy an usual holiday destination, why not book a week stay in an orangery? At Frampton Court in Gloucestershire, you will find a stunning rococo orangery built in about 1750. The design is based on...
Posted on 27 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Powis Castle was once a medieval military fortress for the Welsh Princes of Powys and parts of it date back to 1200. Now in the ownership of the National Trust, it was for over 400 years...
Posted on 23 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Philip Stanhope, the 2nd Earl of Chesterfield was born in 1633 and did the grand tour of Europe before inheriting his father’s estate of Bretby in Derbyshire. Using Versailles as his inspiration he...
Posted on 21 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
I’ve written before about the first English Orangery built for Sir Francis Carew in about 1580 and the use of orange as a word in The History of the Orangery and now have...
Posted on 19 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Along with the History of the Conservatory and the History of the Orangery on our website, we also have a History of Glass and…
Posted on 17 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Here is a first hand report on the fire at the Crystal Palace on the 30th November 1936, reported in The Times the following day. A STRIKING SPECTACLE From afar off the great red glow...
Posted on 16 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
The newly available archive of The Times is allowing me to find all manner of new bits of information about the history of the conservatory. Today I have found an item from the 21st February 1920 that...
Posted on 15 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Times have just made available their archives for online research and I've already spent some happy hours reading about the Great Exhibition of 1851 and other events that helped the...
Posted on 14 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
When conservatories were cold draughty places with single glazing and no heating, it was the dog that got the freedom of it in the winter when banned for some reason from the rest of the house. But...
Posted on 13 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
I have been reading some research from an insurance company that stated that home improvement projects typically cost an average of around £20,000 and that conservatory and...
Posted on 12 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Roof lanterns can be created in a variety of different shapes and sizes to suit the design and the position of the conservatory or orangery. For example in south-facing positions a roof lantern will...
Posted on 11 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
With the arrival of the hottest day of the year so far, my thoughts turn to how to quench my thirst and so I thought Iā€™d research when and how the products of the Orangery began to be used in drinks...
Posted on 10 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
No it’s not Kew Gardens or even Syon House; but the conservatory that became famous a month ago when an unpaid builder demolished it...
Posted on 08 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
It is always a pleasure to bring you news of a special offer, especially when it is such a great one as this. Yes a free conservatory or orangery can be yours this month. Let me tell you all about it...
Posted on 07 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
We recently completed this beautiful modern Georgian Conservatory for a client who needed a design that would complement their home and give them a large additional space in which to relax...
Posted on 05 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you’re planning a holiday in Portugal this summer and have enough of sitting on the beach or round a pool, you could spend a pleasant morning or afternoon visiting the Botanic Garden of the University of...
Posted on 05 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
The credit crunch isn’t just putting the brake on house prices rises they are going into reverse. In some instances you can sell your home below what it was worth a year ago and find...
Posted on 04 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
I’ve written about Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown several times before. Most people will know his name, as he was the most influential garden designer of his generation and as his fame grew he also...
Posted on 03 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
I have written about the first English Orangery twice before, firstly when writing about the home of Francis Carew and an orangery he built at Beddington in Surrey that Elizabeth I visited, and...
Posted on 02 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Here are our monthly words of advice from Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Kalendar. Even though this was published in 1769; the advice he gives is still most useful, and if you have...
Posted on 01 Jun 2008 by Richmond Oak
Apethorpe Hall, near Oundle in Northamptonshire, is a Grade I country house dating back to the 15th century. Its state apartment was rebuilt between 1622 and 1624 to receive James I...
Posted on 31 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you have a Victorian style conservatory, you might like to give it the finishing touch by displaying plants in it that were popular in Victorian times. Many plants had only recently been introduced into England and...
Posted on 30 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
I wrote about two conservatories, the Palm House and the Bicentennial Conservatory at the Adelaide Botanic Garden some time ago. The first is 130-years old, the...
Posted on 29 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you repeat a story often enough people will eventually believe it. Everywhere I read that the Palacio de Cristal in Madrid’s Parque del Retiro was inspired by the Crystal Palace in London, but...
Posted on 28 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The last member of the Wyatt Family Dynasty I shall write about for a while, is perhaps the most famous. James Wyatt, (1746-1813), was the son of Benjamin and...
Posted on 27 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
Samuel Wyatt was a member of the Wyatt Dynasty that built many homes and conservatories in the Georgian and Victorian periods. Son of Benjamin Wyatt who...
Posted on 26 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The name Wyatt often comes up when describing country houses and conservatories of the Georgian and Victorian period, so I thought it would be a good idea to write about this family who...
Posted on 25 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
Following on from my story about the Tatton Fernery the other day, here’s news about some of the other conservatories there. Glasshouses were built at Tatton...
Posted on 24 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
This week at the Chelsea Flower Show macrozamia moorei an Australian cycad, caused a bit of a stir when the Duke of Edinburgh saw it. An Australian gardening expert...
Posted on 23 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
I was going to write about conservatories at Tatton Park in Cheshire, but before I do so on another day, here’s a small diversion on the subject of Ferneries. I’ve written once before on...
Posted on 22 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
As the vast majority of the conservatories we design are built in oak, I thought I had better write a few words about the oak we use after reading a headline, Many Oak Species Under Threat...
Posted on 21 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The first glasshouses at Eden Park were built in the 1880’s to provide the city with plants and shrubs for park and municipal displays. In 1902, a greenhouse designed for public display was opened, but...
Posted on 20 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
Although building conservatories in a conservation area is covered elsewhere on our website, it’s a topic we frequently get asked about, so I thought I would go over some of the more important...
Posted on 19 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
An article in the Sunday Times today extolled the reasons for building extensions to a home now that the property price boom is over. Their argument is that to outperform the property market...
Posted on 18 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
I suppose that now that the football season is almost over and there’s a Test Match on at Lords, we should expect rain rather than the fine weather we enjoyed last weekend! It certainly makes people think...
Posted on 17 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
Opened in 1996, the conservatory at the Rio Grande Botanical Gardens is made up of two pavilions, one displaying Mediterranean Plants, and the other featuring plants from the arid climates...
Posted on 15 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Conservatory of Flowers in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, is one of the most famous conservatories in the world. I have mentioned it before here, first of all in a story about the conservatory builders...
Posted on 12 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
I’ve discovered some more old postcards showing conservatories that help illustrate some of the conservatories I have written about in the past few months. The first is an interior...
Posted on 11 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
A new conservatory is planned for Sinnissippi Park In Rockford, Illinois as part of the centenary celebrations planned there for 2009. This week the halfway point was passed in the fund-raising project to...
Posted on 10 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
I came across some really old photographs of a conservatory that was once on the west wing of the White House in Washington and thought I’d better research a little more about it so I could...
Posted on 09 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
In Asheville, North Carolina, you will find a 250-room mansion designed for George and Edith Vanderbilt. An amazing construction built on the lines of a French chateau on steroids, it is...
Posted on 08 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
Even though the restored Palm House at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden no longer has plants within it, this doesn’t mean that there are no longer any working conservatories in the...
Posted on 07 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The splendid looking Palm House in the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens in New York was designed by the firm of McKim, Mead, and White; probably the leading architectural firm in the...
Posted on 06 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
Here are our monthly words of advice from Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Kalendar. Even though this was published in 1769; the advice he gives is still most useful, and if you have orange trees in your conservatory or...
Posted on 05 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The conservatories at Duke Gardens, Somerville, NJ will be closing on the 28th May, so if you wish to see them as the owners originally planned them, you just have a few days left before...
Posted on 03 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
If nothing else indicates how popular conservatories are becoming, a story from The Northern Echo gives you a good indication. The newspaper reports that thieves have stolen everything of value from a luxury...
Posted on 02 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you really want to open your house into the garden, consider the many benefits of specifying sliding doors or folding doors into your conservatory design. Folding or sliding doors open far wider than...
Posted on 01 May 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Como Conservatory, now known as the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory, in Como Park was built in 1915. The park opened in the late 1880’s after some local wrangling over money. It had been back...
Posted on 28 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Mapperton Hall near Bearminster in Dorset was built in the reign of Henry VIII by Robert and Mary Morgan. Robert was one of a select company of men who were allowed to wear their hats...
Posted on 27 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Many of the national papers today ran a story about an innovative eco-friendly home in a Cotswold nature reserve being sold for a £7.2 million. Many of them claimed this was a...
Posted on 26 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
The 1st Earl of Portland; William, Baron Bentinck, 1649-23 was a Dutch and English nobleman who early in his life became a friend and close advisor of William Henry, Prince of Orange...
Posted on 25 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Lucille Halsell conservatory in the San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Texas, had to be designed with very different considerations than a conservatory built in Europe. While we worry about...
Posted on 24 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
News reaches me that a builder who was not paid for the £22,000 porch and conservatory he built for a customer has taken revenge by demolishing his own handiwork. I just wanted to reassure you that...
Posted on 23 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
I read that a plane tree in Mayfair has been valued at £750,000, making it Britain’s most valuable tree. The plane trees in Berkeley Square are supposed to be among the oldest of their kind in central London, having been...
Posted on 22 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
When I first saw the photograph below, I thought it was a conservatory on the side of a hill. Then when I took a closer look and read more about it, I discovered it was a...
Posted on 21 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
I have mentioned Frank Lloyd Wright in these pages before, when describing the Boettcher Conservatory in the Denver Botanic Garden designed by Horbein and White and influenced by...
Posted on 20 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you have a Georgian or Victorian style traditional conservatory, you might like to complete its setting by using furniture inside and out from the same period. Metal began to be used for...
Posted on 19 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
I’ve written about the Great Conservatory in Syon Park before, but I thought I’d write about some of the people involved in its construction; first of all Thomas Cundy, builder of the...
Posted on 18 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
At Tregothnan Gardens in Cornwall a Wollemi Pine has just produced its first cones. Nothing surprising in that you may think, but the 2 million-year-old Wollemi Pine, was thought to have been...
Posted on 17 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
They’ve built a new conservatory at Kew Gardens, not a traditional conservatory, but a gallery specially designed to “conserve” Botanical Art rather than plants. The Shirley Sherwood Gallery...
Posted on 16 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
I was fascinated by a TV programme last night about the printing of the Gutenberg Bible in 1455 and went off to find out when the first book on gardening was printed...
Posted on 15 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
From time-to-time I come across information that will enable me to update the History of the Orangery on our website. I’ve already noted the word "orange" to describe the...
Posted on 14 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
In our Conservatory Advice section of our website, you will find a section devoted to Garden Furniture, but until I add this to it, there is nothing there at the moment about wire furniture...
Posted on 13 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Gardens at Killruddery House are the oldest in Ireland still surviving in their original 17th century style. The Orangery was designed and built by William Burn, the Scottish architect in...
Posted on 12 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
I’ve written before in these pages that “people who live in glass houses shouldn’t…!” and the traditional solution has been to go indoors to do whatever you want to do, or...
Posted on 11 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Walking around the Glassex exhibition the other day while there to pick up our Gold Award (did I mention that!) in the Conservatory of the Year Competition, I...
Posted on 10 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
We were delighted to receive two more awards for our conservatories at Glassex 2008 yesterday. Judges in this national competition to find the best conservatories built in the past 12-months...
Posted on 09 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Since the Royal Mint announced a new issue of coins last week, a number of coin collectors and old fogies have been up in arms about playing around...
Posted on 08 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Here again are our monthly words of advice from Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Kalendar. Even those this was published in 1769; the advice he gives is still most useful, especially...
Posted on 07 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Druid Hall Conservatory in the Botanic Gardens in Baltimore is another conservatory I featured a few days ago in the conservatory postcards…
Posted on 05 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
The original Mitchell Park Conservatory that I illustrated from an old postcard yesterday stood in the park from 1898 to 1955 when due to it…
Posted on 04 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Just for a change today, here are some interesting old photographs of conservatories in the USA and Canada, when I find out more about them...
Posted on 03 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
I’ve mentioned Chance Brothers several times when writing about conservatories of the late 19th century; in the History of the Conservatory and the building of the Crystal Palace. So today…
Posted on 02 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Within the grounds of St George’s Park in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, you will find a fine original Victorian Conservatory. I was surprised to find one there as I associate St George’s Park with...
Posted on 01 Apr 2008 by Richmond Oak
Marston & Langinger is an old and respected conservatory company that we often come up against when quoting for the design and installation of conservatories, orangeries and...
Posted on 31 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
If writing about famous conservatory designers, it’s usually to do with some grand design in a botanic garden, but I found this small Victorian Conservatory designed by a famous author for an even more...
Posted on 30 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Designing a conservatory is one thing, having the talent and engineering skill to build one is something else indeed. In our business our CAD designers have to translate the ideas of our designers...
Posted on 29 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Climatron, the 24,000 sq ft geodesic dome said to be the first ever used as a greenhouse, is the major attraction of the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis. It was built in...
Posted on 27 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Founded in 1859, the Missouri Botanical Garden, sometimes known as "Shaw’s Garden" after its founder Henry Shaw, is one of the oldest botanical institutions in the USA...
Posted on 26 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
I have written previously about the Chiswick House Conservatory, not realising that it should more correctly be described as a Camellia House. It has a central dome...
Posted on 25 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Quad City Conservatory at Rock Island Illinois, is a contemporary conservatory that opened in 1998. Next to the Mississippi River, the conservatory covers...
Posted on 24 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
I've discovered a very unusual conservatory with a beautiful roof that could be the inspiration for a contemporary conservatory today. Strictly it is a Fernery and not a conservatory and...
Posted on 23 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Wilhelma Botanical Gardens together with a Zoo can be found in Bad Cannstatt, a suburb of Stuttgart. The gardens and the buildings were created for King Wilhelm I and...
Posted on 22 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Birmingham Botanical and Horticultural Society in Edgbaston originally managed the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. The Society was founded in 1829 by subscription, when...
Posted on 21 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Palm House in Sefton Park was a gift to the City of Liverpool from Henry Yates Thompson, a local philanthropist and replaced a Band Pavilion that had been...
Posted on 20 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Opened on 16th January 1877, the Bournemouth Winter Garden had been built a short distance from the pier in this fast expanding Dorset town that had only been founded in 1810 and where the...
Posted on 19 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Continuing the story of the conservatories at Longwood Gardens that I started yesterday here’s some information about the Palm House that’s built also there. Designed by...
Posted on 18 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The 22 individual conservatories at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania together create one of the world’s largest connected conservatory structures covering over 150,000 sq ft and rival those at...
Posted on 17 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Today I’m continuing on the theme of famous conservatory architects by writing about Victor Horta who worked with Alphonse Balat on Balat’s later conservatories at Laeken...
Posted on 16 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Alphonse Balat (1819 – 1895), responsible for the conservatory complex at Laeken, received his degree in architecture in Antwerp in 1838. In 1846 Balat moved to Brussels and...
Posted on 15 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
What does the new British Airways terminal at Heathrow have to do with conservatories you may ask, well other than being an interesting piece of engineering, let me explain...
Posted on 14 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Yesterday I wrote about the Winter Garden at Laeken in Brussels, today it is the turn of the Congo Greenhouse or Conservatory.
Posted on 13 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The spectacular Royal Glasshouses at Laeken on the outskirts of Brussels provide a variety of climates in an area covered by nearly five acres of glass...
Posted on 12 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
It’s been a bit windy the past couple of days in case you hadn’t noticed and if this means it has been a little draughty in your conservatory, you should take a look at our new sister website ReplacementConservatory
Posted on 11 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Conservatories get called by other names from time to time, today let’s take a look at a Winter Garden. The Sheffield Winter Garden is one of the largest temperate conservatories to be...
Posted on 10 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Boettcher Conservatory in the Denver Botanic Garden is the largest single structure tropical conservatory in the United States. Commissioned by Claude Boettcher, a member of the philanthropic...
Posted on 08 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
In Heaton Park, Manchester, there is an orangery built in about 1823 for the 2nd Earl of Wilton. Heaton Park, four miles north of Manchester is owned by the local council and...
Posted on 07 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Hyder Ali originally commissioned the Lalbagh Botanic Garden in the southern part of Bangalore in 1760, but his son, Tipu Sultan, completed it. Covering 240 acres the garden contains a glasshouse...
Posted on 06 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Opened in July 2007, the Tropical House in the National Botanic Garden of Wales was designed by architect John Belle who donated his services…
Posted on 03 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The National Botanic Garden of Wales is the first national botanic garden to be created in the United Kingdom for over 200 years. Laid out on the site of the Middleton Estate, a Regency Parkland in...
Posted on 02 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
Time once again for our monthly words of advice from Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Kalendar that he published in 1769. ” Water your Orange-trees, Myrtles, Bays, Amomum Plinii, and other...
Posted on 01 Mar 2008 by Richmond Oak
The History of the Orangery is one of the popular pages on our website. Written about a year ago, it deserves a few updates as our knowledge of orangeries increases. So here’s a new item...
Posted on 29 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
I recently came across an old photograph of a conservatory at Sandringham House, originally published in the Strand Magazine in April 1893. Delving deeper, I found...
Posted on 28 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Although the first botanical garden in Copenhagen was established at the University as far back as 1600 it was nearly a hundred years before...
Posted on 27 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
A number of articles I wrote early on in conservatory news have for some reason disappeared, so I'm repeating a few of them because of their importance to the history of the conservatory...
Posted on 24 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Have you seen the conservatory sequence in the BBC Programme Room 101? In case you’re not familiar with it, each week a guest has to...
Posted on 23 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Over 160 years, conservatory design has increasingly influenced the architecture of public buildings and homes. The other day I stumbled across this stunning house with walls...
Posted on 22 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Self Build and DIY conservatories and orangeries are a way of saving money on a new conservatory, but it’s not something we can recommend unless you have some building experience...
Posted on 21 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh was founded in 1670 as a physic garden to grow medicinal plants. In 1763 it moved to its present site and the...
Posted on 19 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Botanical Gardens in Sheffield were established by local residents concerned about the lack of public open space in their city. They formed the Sheffield Botanical and Horticultural Society and...
Posted on 18 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Located in the Olbrich Botanical Gardens in Madison, Wisconsin; the Bolz Conservatory is a diamond-domed building that opened in...
Posted on 17 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
In Edmonton, Alberta, Canada you will find four stunning pyramid conservatories designed by architect Peter Hemingway. Hemingway, who was born in England and moved to Edmonton when...
Posted on 16 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
As well as the Palm House I wrote about yesterday, there is also an orangery in the 63-acre park at Bicton. It overlooks the Italian Garden, laid out in...
Posted on 15 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Built in the 1820’s the Palm House at Bicton is set in magnificent gardens in East Devon’s picturesque Otter Valley near Exeter. The conservatory is listed Grade l by...
Posted on 14 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Following on from my item about the first Schwetzingen Orangerie, here is the story of the second one. When the Elector developed an interest in exotic plants, Nicolas de Pigage had to...
Posted on 13 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
There are two orangeries in the garden of Schwetzingen Castle near Heidelberg and today I’m writing about the older one. Built for Carl Theodor, the Elector Palatine...
Posted on 12 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Heritage Lottery Fund has just confirmed a final award of £7.6 million towards the £11.7 million restoration of Chiswick Gardens, including the conservatory...
Posted on 11 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Hidden in the gardens at Longleat House in Wiltshire, you will find an orangery commissioned by the 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765 - 1837) who employed Jeffry Wyatville to...
Posted on 10 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
A Grade ll listed Orangery in Lambeth that was once part of the Henry Thornton estate, has recently received a grant of £25,000 to help restore it to its former glory. The Orangery is...
Posted on 09 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Burggarten (Castle Garden) Palmenhaus (conservatory) in Vienna was built between 1901 and 1906 and is an important landmark in the Austrian capital. Its architecture is a mixture of Baroque and...
Posted on 08 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
After 130 years in the Palm House in Schonbrunn, the imperial "Sisi Palm", named after the wife of Emperor Franz Joseph I, is going to be cut down. Already 40 years old when it was planted in the...
Posted on 07 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Yesterday I wrote about the second largest Orangery in Europe in Vienna; today a short item on the largest conservatory in Europe in the same city...
Posted on 06 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Schonbrunn Orangery in Austria, 189 metres in length and 10 metres wide, is after the one at Versailles, the second largest orangery in the world. There was already an orangery garden...
Posted on 05 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Zwinger in Dresden, Germany is the city’s most famous landmark. A baroque complex of pavilions and galleries, like many of Dresden’s most prominent buildings, it was...
Posted on 04 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
At Stowe House in Northampton you’ll find a building called a Menagerie, which is sometimes known as an orangerie. If you are confused...
Posted on 03 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Croome Park in Worcestershire was Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown’s first complete landscape design, begun in 1751 commissioned by George Coventry, 6th Earl of Coventry. The house at Croombe was...
Posted on 02 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Time for our monthly words of advice from Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Kalendar that he published in 1769. ”If this month proves severe (as it often happens), you must be...
Posted on 01 Feb 2008 by Richmond Oak
Warwick Castle was founded in 1068 and has been rebuilt and updated several times. The castle provides a great day out for...
Posted on 31 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Sezincote House in Gloucestershire is home to a unique orangery; but more on that in a moment. The word Sezincote is derived from...
Posted on 30 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Purchased by the 1st Earl of Shelburne in the mid 18th century, Bowood House and Gardens in Wiltshire have been improved by...
Posted on 29 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
The house at Wrest Park built in 1834-39 was inspired an 18th-century French chateau and is set in over 90 acres of gardens. Its owner, Thomas Philip, 2nd Earl de Grey...
Posted on 28 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Heveningham Hall in Suffolk was designed by Sir Robert Taylor with interiors by James Watt and landscaped by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. Based on an original...
Posted on 27 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
This beautiful Orangery was designed by the well known architect Edwin Lutyens for the Edwardian Garden at Hestercombe in Somerset...
Posted on 26 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Did you miss our conservatory news yesterday? In case you did and didn't follow the link to the website you can take a look at it here:
Posted on 25 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
We've recently updated our sister website which covers the subject of conservatory design to include a short introduction to conservatories, their design and architecture. If you are looking for...
Posted on 24 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
In the gable above a conservatory or orangery door you will usually find a fanlight, typically semicircular or semielliptical with glazing bars radiating within it from a central floret like a...
Posted on 23 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
In yesterday’s item about Barton Seagrave Hall Orangery, I mentioned Humphry Repton as being the architect. I also mentioned that the orangery had a...
Posted on 22 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Orangery at Barton Seagrave Hall in Northamptonshire is a Grade I listed building, currently undergoing restoration funded by English Heritage. The earliest parts of the Hall are...
Posted on 21 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Many peoples first experience of a conservatory would have been while playing the board game Cluedo and trying to work out who had murdered Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US version called...
Posted on 20 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Completing yesterdays story about Monet and the Orangerie, here ’s the building on the opposite side of the Tuileries Gardens from the Orangerie. Built a year earlier in...
Posted on 19 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Orangerie des Tuileries in Paris was built in 1852 during the reign of Napoleon III. Designed by architects Firmin Bourgeois and Ludovico Visconti, you can find it...
Posted on 18 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you have an old conservatory that needs replacement, here are a few things you should consider before embarking on your replacement conservatory project...
Posted on 17 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Great Vine in Hampton Court Palace Gardens is the oldest and largest known vine in the world and is housed in an old-fashioned conservatory that is more like a...
Posted on 15 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
For the third year running one of our conservatories has won an award at the annual Conservatories Online Awards. Not bad, we have only entered for the past three years and...
Posted on 14 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
In January many conservatory manufacturers and installers offer conservatory sale prices and conservatory discounts to attract customers. For example...
Posted on 13 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Garfield Park Conservatory in Chicago, USA celebrates the centenary of its opening this year. Four and a half acres in size, it replaced three earlier conservatories on the site...
Posted on 10 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
The Conservative Wall at Chatsworth, so called because it was designed to conserve plants was built by Joseph Paxton in 1848. It is a series of greenhouses running...
Posted on 09 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Further to my item on Another Type of Conservatory – A Camellia House at Wollaton Hall the other day, here is another one at Culzean Castle, a...
Posted on 08 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Towards the end of his life Sir Joseph Paxton was in much demand for as a garden designer and builder of conservatories and orangeries. By this time...
Posted on 07 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
There are a number of Camellia Houses around the country and the first I will write about is the one at Wollaton Hall in Nottinghamshire. The Camellia first arrived in Europe at...
Posted on 06 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Sir Jeffry Wyatville was born on August 3, 1766. Both his father, Joseph and his uncle’s James and Samuel, were architects. At the ages of twelve and fourteen he...
Posted on 05 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
I often write about a conservatory having to complement the property it is attached too; using a Georgian style for a Georgian period or neo-Georgian building for example. And I have also...
Posted on 04 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
2008 marks the 500th anniversary of the birth of Andrea Palladio on 30th November 1508 and during the course of this year you will probably...
Posted on 03 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Time for our monthly words of advice from Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Kalendar that he published in 1769. Here's the top of the page that...
Posted on 02 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
Here are the answers to our New Year Conservatory Crossword. I hope you enjoyed having a go at it...
Posted on 01 Jan 2008 by Richmond Oak
If you are at a loose end before the New Year celebrations start, have a go at our Conservatory Crossword Puzzle...
Posted on 31 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
We already have a comprehensive History of Glass and its influence on conservatory architecture on our website, but here is an update based on some further research...
Posted on 29 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
As we approach the end of the year, here are just a few of the conservatories we have designed and installed in the past 12-months. They include Sunrooms; Victorian Gothic and Contemporary Conservatories...
Posted on 28 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
I’uve just discovered an orangery that was part of the manor that stood at Wimbledon for many centuries. It was crown property until the reign of Henry VIII and for a...
Posted on 27 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Belton House near Grantham in Lincolnshire was built for Sir John Brownlow between 1685 and 1688. It is built in the Carolean architectural style...
Posted on 26 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Here are the answers to our Conservatory Christmas Quiz:
Posted on 25 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you’ve been reading this for the past few months you should find our Conservatory Christmas Quiz a breeze. Good luck and Merry Christmas to you all...
Posted on 24 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
I’m running out of Lord & Burnham conservatories and greenhouses to write about, so this item about the conservatory at Sonnenberg Gardens and...
Posted on 23 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Garden lighting has increased in popularity in parallel with the development, availability and increasing illumination quality of solar-powered garden lighting and today they are a worthwhile investment...
Posted on 22 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
In case you’re imagining that this is another story about me lazing in the conservatory drinking, you’re completely wrong. This is about how coffee has been harvested at the Eden Project in Cornwall to...
Posted on 18 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Apparently global warming is allowing the Oak Processionary Moth Thaumetopoea processionea to survive in the UK. If you haven’t heard of it before, allow me to...
Posted on 17 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
In a previous story about The First English Orangery, I noted how Queen Elizabeth I had visited Sir Francis Carew in 1599 and probably seen and...
Posted on 16 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
The Orangery at Versailles is a well-known building and I will write about it at some length another day. But in the meantime, I’ve managed to find some information about the original orangery...
Posted on 15 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
How long will a timber conservatory survive? Well, a collection of 19 metal vessels from the late Roman period has recently gone on temporary display at the Museum of London that might...
Posted on 14 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Last night the winner of the The People’s £50 Million Lottery Contest that I wrote about ten days ago was announced. Unfortunately, the project for the Sherwood Forest Trust...
Posted on 13 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
After a really cold and frosty night, you can appreciate the work that goes into ensuring that conservatory insulation has been well taken care of. Starting from the...
Posted on 12 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
The transformation of the Orangery to the Conservatory probably lasted 100 years and the names were interchangeable depending on how...
Posted on 10 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Towards the end of the 1840’s great rivalry existed between gardeners to grow the first Victoria Regia or Victoria Amazonica in England.
Posted on 07 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
I have written some brief stories about the conservatory at Chatsworth House before and also about the life of Joseph Paxton its designer. But...
Posted on 05 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Here is an interesting story about a conservatory built in 1824 at The Grange in Hampshire. It played a small part in WWII and is now the home of Grange Opera.
Posted on 03 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
This week will be a big one for oak conservation. On 3rd December ITV will begin showing a series of programmes to promote The People’s £50 Million Lottery Contest, in which Brian Blessed will be...
Posted on 02 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
The Gardeners Kalendar was written by Philip Miller and first published in 1769. As I have written before, it is as relevant today as it was then and contains much useful advice for today’s conservatory gardener...
Posted on 01 Dec 2007 by Richmond Oak
Today is the anniversary of the Crystal Palace being destroyed by fire in 1936. At six o’clock in the evening, the manager of the Crystal Palace noticed...
Posted on 30 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
We recently completed this stunning looking conservatory for a client in Devon. Perched high with views across the countryside and the sea beyond, its huge expanse of glass...
Posted on 29 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
The biggest shake-up of planning laws for twenty years may allow the building of more kitchen and conservatory extensions without planning permission. The Planning Reform Bill published this week will...
Posted on 28 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Over the last weekend we made the first of a number of new changes to our conservatory website to make it more interesting to our many visitors. We have a new...
Posted on 27 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Designed by Jules Hardouin-Mansart, the Orangery at Chateaux de Sceaux was built in about 1684 and is one of the oldest in France. It was built for...
Posted on 26 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Continuing my investigations into the introduction of oranges into England, today I have a sort item on Orange Flower Water. The earliest appearance of this phrase is noted...
Posted on 23 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
I promised to write more about the Grecian Conservatory advertised for sale in Loudon’s Gardener’s Magazine. At the end of the letter advertising it from Roberts the Gas, there is a...
Posted on 21 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Described as a chaste specimen of Grecian architecture, but looking to me something that we now recognise as a Georgian Conservatory, I found this conservatory for sale in...
Posted on 20 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Edward Lloyd IV, a wealthy planter with Welsh ancestry, purchased what was to become Wye House in Talbot County, Maryland in 1658. He named the house...
Posted on 19 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
The Nash Conservatory at Kew Gardens is one of many of John Nash's famous designs, but he was also responsible for a number of other conservatories, including one at...
Posted on 17 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Our conservatories are bespoke made in oak using timber from sustainable sources. We use oak because its great strength allows us to...
Posted on 16 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
I never cease to be surprised at how someone can be allowed to erect a dreadful building close to a magnificent one or in beautiful surroundings. But despite planning requirements and...
Posted on 15 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
I’ve written before that the word ‘conservatory’ had been used historically to describe what we might recognise as a greenhouse or orangery today and that in the mid...
Posted on 14 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
I know that we all get behind in our reading from time-to-time and the pile of unread magazines gets higher and higher, but that isn't the reason I've just finished reading The Gardener’s Chronicle from 5th July 1851. And...
Posted on 12 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Richard Turner was the Ironmaster at the Hammersmith Iron Works in Dublin that he built in 1834 and was thus in good position to enable the building of conservatories and...
Posted on 11 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Decimus Burton was the designer of the Palm House and the Temperate House at Kew Gardens. He was...
Posted on 09 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
As well as conventional conservatories at Kew Gardens, there are contemporary conservatories as well and the most stunning of these is the Alpine House that opened in 2006. There have been three Alpine Houses at Kew since...
Posted on 08 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Here's a rather nice illustration and advertisement for a Georgian Style Conservatory I found in a copy of the Horticultural Register published in 1861...
Posted on 07 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Tucked away in a corner close to the Princess Diana Conservatory at Kew Gardens, you’ll find the Secluded Garden, an area much more like a domestic garden than other parts of Kew where everything is...
Posted on 04 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Last month I wrote about The Gardeners Kalendar, written by Philip Miller and first published in 1769. The book is as...
Posted on 02 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
Today is the anniversary of the closing of the New York Crystal Palace in 1854. Following the success of the Great Exhibition in London in 1851, a group of New Yorkers decided that they too wanted to host an International Exhibition to...
Posted on 01 Nov 2007 by Richmond Oak
As mentioned in my item on Owen Jones the other day, Matthew Digby Wyatt was partly responsible for decorations of the Crystal Palace when it moved to Sydenham. Before that he had been...
Posted on 31 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
I was looking for something on haunted conservatories to write about to prepare you for Halloween and stumbled across...
Posted on 30 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
I mentioned Owen Jones in my item on St Pancras Station and Conservatories the other day. He also influenced the Wentworth Castle Conservatory with its...
Posted on 29 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Wandering round a Garden Centre the other day, I stumbled upon several pots of pineapples for sale and thought they would be amusing to grow in the conservatory at home. Four hundred years ago the pineapple was...
Posted on 28 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Eurostar services will shortly be using the restored St Pancras Station as its terminal and thousands of people using it each day will marvel at its great roof. Designed by William Barlow and Rowland Ordish, the single span roof is...
Posted on 27 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Wentworth Castle in the village of Stainborough, near Barnsley in Yorkshire has a Victorian Conservatory in its grounds much in need of restoration. The conservatory featured on the BBC’s Restoration Series in 2003, but...
Posted on 26 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Many thanks to the person who sent me this extract from Hot-Houses, Greenhouses, An Aquarium, Conservatories, &c. by George Tod. Apparently, Tod was a surveyor and Hot-House builder and...
Posted on 25 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Lord & Burnham are probably the most famous maker of greenhouses and conservatories in the USA. The business started in 1849 when a carpenter named Frederick A. Lord began building greenhouses in...
Posted on 21 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
With much colder nights now I’ve brought in a few plants in from the garden to over winter in the conservatory and add a splash of bright colour. Within a few days I noticed that some of the plants had been attacked by...
Posted on 19 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
We look at all sorts of Victorian architecture to get ideas for the design of new conservatories and with half-term next week I thought I had better write about a place the family can visit that might entertain young and old alike...
Posted on 18 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
The Pagoda Conservatory style refers to the roof of the pagoda or steeple; which is usually either pointed or ball-shaped. The design is inspired by Buddhist architecture that, via China, influenced British design from...
Posted on 17 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
A report in The Times tells that the Palace of Westminster may soon be getting its own courtyard conservatory as part of essential work required to repair...
Posted on 16 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you read my Acorn Bread recipe the other day you might be interested in a few more specialist Acorn recipes. I'll start off with one that was popular in many parts of Europe during...
Posted on 15 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
We use oak to make our bespoke conservatories and orangeries and some of our clients use these as an extension to their kitchen making a kitchen conservatory or orangery. We love oak for its strength as...
Posted on 14 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
I usually try to give you details of one conservatory to visit each week in case you want a day out and to get inspiration for your conservatory or garden. As I've spent so much time talking about John Evelyn...
Posted on 13 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Lead sheet is often used for the flashings needed on conservatory roofs and specified for lead roofs on orangeries. Lead is in fact one of our oldest roofing materials and was used by...
Posted on 12 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Yesterday I promised you more information about how John Evelyn introduced conservatory heating. Underfloor heating had been used in at least one conservatory before...
Posted on 11 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
John Evelyn (1620-1706) was a writer and a noted gardener. The Oxford English Dictionary credits him as the first to use the word conservatory, referencing as the source for this his book...
Posted on 10 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
As well as the orangery at Hampton Court Palace I wrote about the other day, there is an orangery at Hampton Court near Leominster in Herefordshire. Except that this orangery was originally described as a conservatory in...
Posted on 09 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
"A Green-house, Orangery, or Conservatory, ought, if possible to be attached to every suburban residence." Sage advice from The Suburban Gardener and Villa Companion, by John Claudius Loudon and...
Posted on 08 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
I’ve just come across a book published nearly 240 years ago with conservatory in the title and plenty of conservatory advice within. Published in 1769 the book was written by Philip Miller who was gardener for the Worshipful Company of Apothecaries at...
Posted on 07 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
When I wrote about the restoration of the Lower Orangery Garden at Hampton Court Palace a little while ago, I didn't have a photo to accompany the story. So as the sun was...
Posted on 06 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you fly into Oklahoma City and ask a cab to take you to the conservatory, you could easily end up in a rock music venue rather than a botanical garden. I discovered this when searching for conservatory in Google and...
Posted on 05 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
The oldest surviving orangery in the UK is at Ham House near Richmond, Surrey. Built around 1670 the orangery is based on classical Dutch architecture. Orangeries of the...
Posted on 04 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
This Lean To Hardwood Conservatory in Oak has recently been completed in the garden of a clients period property. As well as...
Posted on 03 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Here are some conservatory quotations I thought...
Posted on 02 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
Today marks the anniversary of the signing of the contract in 1850 to build the Crystal Palace for the Great Exhibition and begin the Victorian love affair with conservatories. Actually, such was the speed with which the building had to be completed...
Posted on 01 Oct 2007 by Richmond Oak
First established in 1924 to commemorate the coronation of Emperor Taisho, the Kyoto's Botanical Gardens are the oldest in Japan. The gardens fell...
Posted on 30 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you've been considering adding a conservatory to your home to increase its value, here's some valuable research recently released. According to the Halifax Home Improvement Survey...
Posted on 29 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Ensuring a client is happy with their conservatory design and installation takes time…sometimes more than a year; that's not because we are slow builders or that things go wrong, but because...
Posted on 28 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
When I wrote about the Belle Isle Conservatory yesterday I hadn't realised that there is another one with a very similar name, but Belleisle not Belle Isle, in Scotland. Belleisle conservatory is part of...
Posted on 27 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Described as the oldest conservatory in the United States, the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory can be found in Detroit, Michigan. When I first saw it I wondered why it looked so familiar, but apparently it is...
Posted on 26 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
I mentioned Fox Talbot's 'heated stove' a few days ago and thought I should explain what I meant by that. While the word 'conservatory' had been used in architecture to describe what we might recognise as a greenhouse or conservatory today, in...
Posted on 25 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
One item often overlooked in conservatory design is the use of correct period door furniture to match the style of conservatory being built. Someone once described doorknobs as...
Posted on 24 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
We design and build oak conservatories because we love the look of the timber and the strength it has. But oak has a history in folklore so we gathered these together into eight interesting facts you...
Posted on 23 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Following on from my item about Fox Talbot, I believe I may have found the earliest surviving photograph of a conservatory. The story...
Posted on 22 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
I was looking for some early conservatory photographs and started by researching the work of William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the positive/negative photographic process and who...
Posted on 21 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
After I wrote about Victorian Encaustic tiles the other day someone asked me if they were still available for conservatories today. In fact they are and there is an interesting story associated with them...
Posted on 20 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
A popular place for wedding photography in New York is the Central Park Conservatory Garden. But before it was a garden there really was a conservatory there from 1898 until 1934. In those days the conservatory was used to...
Posted on 18 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Conservatory lighting and ventilation in Victorian times were not straightforward matters. I recently came across an article from the Scientific American Supplement published in 1885...
Posted on 17 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Continuing my current theme on Victorian conservatories and decoration, I have found a splendid property managed by the National Trust that combines three great loves of Richmond Oak. Tyntesfield is a Victorian Gothic Revival property near...
Posted on 16 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you are planning to install a Victorian Style Conservatory, you should consider a Victorian Tiled Floor like the one shown in the Victorian Gothic Conservatory we pictured the other day. There were two types of tiles used in Victorian homes...
Posted on 15 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
This recently completed Victorian Gothic style conservatory includes many design features familiar to anybody with some knowledge of the Victorian Age, some of which we talk about elsewhere on our website at the Victorian Conservatory page...
Posted on 14 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
We are proud of our green credentials and are continually looking at ways to build conservatories so that they have less impact on the environment during construction, when you use them and...
Posted on 13 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
When I wrote about Georgian Conservatories the other day and the use of the "double cube" in Georgian Architecture, I threatened to talk another day about the Golden Ratio. The golden ratio is used in maths and the arts, including design and...
Posted on 12 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Let's start off by looking at the word "carpenter", a word derived from the Old French word carpentier that was in turn derived from the Latin carpentrius (artifex) - carriage (creator). So interestingly the carpenter was...
Posted on 11 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Choosing the appropriate paint finish for your conservatory is an important decision. Unfortunately, it is not always a decision that you are left alone to take. If you live in a Listed Property, in a Conservation Area or Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), you may have to...
Posted on 10 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
Next weekend 15th and 16th September, one of the great free events of the year happens once more in London. Open House London is an opportunity to visit homes and offices to view architectural and design that is often unavailable to see at any other time of the year - free. So for example...
Posted on 09 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
I read that the UK's highest orangery may soon be built as part of a 422 feet tall skyscraper in Croydon. Along with the orangery it's planned to have...
Posted on 08 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
In the conservatory advice pages of our website there's an item on Georgian Conservatories that talks about the interior size using "the double cube proportions so loved by Georgian architects". Somebody asked me what this meant, so here goes. First of all I need to introduce you to...
Posted on 07 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you enjoy listening to music as much as I do, you’ll quickly discover that a conservatory is not an ideal space in which to crank up the loudspeakers on the hi-fi. You get more reverberations and it can annoy the neighbours. This is quite easy to understand I suppose if...
Posted on 05 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
I have an interest in the development of the conservatory and my knowledge of Georgian Conservatories has just been expanded after finding an old gardening book published in 1823 that contains an interesting few pages about the use and technology in Georgian Conservatories of the time. It was written by...
Posted on 04 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
On 11th June 1811 the Prince of Wales, later to be George IV, held a lavish event in his newly completed Conservatory in Carlton House. The Prince's advisor was...
Posted on 03 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you think you have a home that would make a good setting for a TV or film why not register it with a company that searches for suitable locations for filming? What they are usually looking for is a property with...
Posted on 02 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
In our conservatory glass history on our website, we describe how the Roman Emperor Tiberius had out of season cucumbers grown for him in a cold frame, probably using mica for the glazing. I have now researched this a little more and...
Posted on 01 Sep 2007 by Richmond Oak
To keep your conservatory looking smart here are a few tips for cleaning conservatory window and roof blinds. It’s best not to leave cleaning as a six-monthly or annual chore, far better to clean often, especially Venetian Blinds. This can be done...
Posted on 30 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
One of the problems with any large expanse of glass are birds flying into windows and doors. Tinted and clear glass are invisible to birds and if they see...
Posted on 29 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Choosing conservatory lighting is more difficult than doing so for internal rooms of the home. The lights in your conservatory have a different type of ceiling to contend with and then there are...
Posted on 28 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Choosing your conservatory accessories means looking at practical accessories that no conservatory should be without as well as accessories that might be nice to have now, but can always be added later. So let’s take a look at some conservatory accessories...
Posted on 27 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
One of the most searched for items on the Internet recently has been "scientists hail frozen smoke." I was intrigued by the article in The Times that started this frenzy and decided to investigate further as I was...
Posted on 26 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you are looking for a day out, let me recommend to you the Horniman Museum, because if you pay it a visit you’ll also see a wonderful Grade II listed conservatory. The museum was founded by Victorian tea trader Frederick John Horniman and...
Posted on 25 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
If you live, or aspire to live, in a Georgian home you may be aware of the work of the The Georgian Group , a national charity for the protection and preservation of Georgian buildings, monuments and landscapes. Founded 70 years ago, they...
Posted on 24 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Pavilions, Garden Studios and Summer Houses were popular additions to properties with large gardens in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Sometimes with a veranda attached, they were places to relax and rest in often in...
Posted on 23 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
An item about conservatory furniture that I wrote for our website recently has on rereading, a complete lack of understanding about how an interior designer would approach the subject...
Posted on 22 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
I’m indebted to the Daily Telegraph who recently described Orangeries as the new conservatories. All the smart gardens have gone citrus crazy, they say...
Posted on 21 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
In December Cunard’s new liner the Queen Victoria built at a cost of £300 million, including conservatory, will make its maiden voyage...
Posted on 20 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
No less a person than Mrs Beeton, writing in her Book of Household Management, reminds us of the importance of adequate insurance for a conservatory. She quotes a case, "in which a glass door led into a conservatory..."
Posted on 19 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
I talked about British Standards the other day, but overlooked BS 6399. As is the way with all bureaucracy this standard is being replaced with another one with more digits and wording, it’s now BS EN 1991-1-3:2003...
Posted on 18 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
A wood floor can provide a very attractive finish to a conservatory, but should you choose solid hardwood, engineered hardwood or laminate? Let’s take a look at the differences...
Posted on 17 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
The British Standards Institute (BSI) is the UK's National Standards Body and the standards they establish represent a consensus...
Posted on 16 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
India celebrates 60 years of independence from Britain today and The Times wrote that perhaps its greatest gift to Britain was the curry. While not averse to a plate of Chicken Tikka Masala and a couple of cold beers myself, I'd like to nominate...
Posted on 15 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Cork floors are ideal for many parts of the home but with the fashion for wood floors and tiled floors, it’s easy to overlook how good a conservatory with a cork floor can be. As any wine aficionado can tell you...
Posted on 14 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Being expert in designing conservatories and orangeries we get asked to design and build other home extensions as well. Here’s a really fantastic front porch we recently completed for a client looking for a porch that would complement their property...
Posted on 13 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Conservatory design and orangery design are often influenced by historic architecture, as are the gardens around them. The Lower Orangery Garden at Hampton Court Palace has recently been reopened after extensive restoration based on twenty years of research. To restore the gardens to their 17th century splendour...
Posted on 11 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
Most people overestimate the size of conservatory they wish to have built and ask for a conservatory design that is far too big. We advise our clients to think about the furniture and accessories they would like to have in their conservatory and then...
Posted on 08 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak
From 1st August, if you are selling a home with four or more bedrooms, you will need a Home Information Pack to show to potential buyers...
Posted on 06 Aug 2007 by Richmond Oak

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